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United States National Library of Medicine
Industrie: Library & information science
Number of terms: 152230
Number of blossaries: 0
Company Profile:
The National Library of Medicine (NLM), on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, is the world's largest medical library. The Library collects materials and provides information and research services in all areas of biomedicine and health care.
Erythrocytes with protoplasmic projections giving the cell a thorny appearance.
Industry:Medical
1) A circumscribed melanosis consisting of a brown-pigmented, velvety verrucosity or fine papillomatosis appearing in the axillae and other body folds. It occurs in association with endocrine disorders, underlying malignancy, administration of certain drugs, or as in inherited disorder. 2) A skin disease characterized by gray-black warty patches usually situated in the axilla or groin or on elbows or knees and sometimes associated with cancer of abdominal viscera.
Industry:Medical
1) The twisted-ladder shape that two linear strands of DNA assume when complementary nucleotides on opposing strands bond together. 2) The description of the structure of a DNA molecule. A DNA molecule consists of two strands that wind around each other like a twisted ladder. Each strand has a backbone made of alternating groups of sugar (deoxyribose) and phosphate groups. Attached to each sugar is one of four bases: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), or thymine (T). The two strands are held together by bonds between the bases, adenine forming a base pair with thymine, and cytosine forming a base pair with guanine.
Industry:Medical
Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.
Industry:Medical
The instructions in a gene that tell the cell how to make a specific protein. A, C, G, and T are the "letters" of the DNA code; they stand for the chemicals adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T), respectively, that make up the nucleotide bases of DNA. Each gene's code combines the four chemicals in various ways to spell out three-letter "words" that specify which amino acid is needed at every step in making a protein.
Industry:Medical
1) A process, involving an individual or family, comprising: evaluation to confirm, diagnose, or exclude a genetic condition, malformation syndrome, or isolated birth defect; discussion of natural history and the role of heredity; identification of medical management issues; calculation and communication of genetic risks; provision of or referral for psychosocial support. 2) Guidance provided by a medical professional typically to individuals with an increased risk of having offspring with a specific genetic disorder and that includes providing information and advice concerning the probability of producing offspring with the disorder, prenatal diagnostic tests, and available treatments. 3) Genetic counseling is the professional interaction between a healthcare provider with specialized knowledge of genetics and an individual or family. The genetic counselor determines whether a condition in the family may be genetic and estimates the chances that another relative may be affected. Genetic counselors also offer and interpret genetic tests that may help to estimate risk of disease. The genetic counselor conveys information in an effort to address concerns of the client and provides psychological counseling to help families adapt to their condition or risk. Definition from: Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms from the National Human Genome Research Institute.
Industry:Medical
1) An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. 2) A disease of the eye marked by increased pressure within the eyeball that can result in damage to the optic disk and gradual loss of vision.
Industry:Medical
1) Anemia due to decreased life span of erythrocytes. 2) Anemia caused by excessive destruction (as in chemical poisoning, infection, or sickle-cell anemia) of red blood cells.
Industry:Medical
DNA sequences of high susceptibility to mutation due to some inherent instability, tendency toward unequal crossing over, or chemical predisposition to single nucleotide substitutions; region where mutations are observed with greater frequency.
Industry:Medical
1) Severely deficient color perception, typically with monochromacy and reduced visual acuity. The atypical form can include normal visual acuity with pseudomonochromacy. 2) A visual defect marked by total color blindness in which the colors of the spectrum are seen as tones of white-gray-black.
Industry:Medical